Escape room game Sydney

Escape room game Sydney

A 1956 novel by Arthur C. Clarke called the City and the Stars contrasted two different societies. One society lived in isolation from the natural world, and though technologically advanced they remain stagnant. The other lived in harmony with the natural world, but never developed their technology past a certain point. While the book mostly focuses on other events and ideas one interesting point is that neither one of these societies could progress without some of the ideas from another society. An isolated system soon gets stuck in a rut.

Individuals can find they get struck in a rut with their life. This rut can be comfortable or frustrating, but either way it is a limit. We feel better if we break free from a rut, though this may initially feel uncomfortable. Of course the most obvious way to break free from a rut is to try something new.

 

Escape room Sydney

An escape room is one way to briefly exist in a different reality. It might be a realistic situation, or a completely supernatural one. But either way it forces us to think outside our usual habits. This give us a sense that the world is bigger than our life and our present experience.

An escape room puzzle, like the better computer adventure games, will show there is more to human thinking than analytical reasoning. Really challenging puzzles use creativity, lateral thinking, word and concept associations, general knowledge, and perhaps other ways of thinking. Perhaps more than anything escape rooms require team work.

Escape rooms are popular for social events, but also company team building exercises. Solving puzzles with friends and colleagues helps us see strengths and limits in other and ourselves. Combining strengths with teamwork is insightful and useful. We become less isolated as individuals, hopefully seeing that we are part of something bigger.

 

Consider an escape room adventure, to get a little bit of a different perspective on life.

Prehistory of Escape Rooms

Escape rooms are a reasonably recent phenomena, appearing in Japan in 2007 and a few years later in Europe and the USA. But there is a history leading up to these first physical escape rooms. The computer game versions of ‘escape-the-room’ date from the late 1980s, and TV shows such as now Get Out Of That also had a similar premises. It is also not hard to see precursors to the escape rooms in other media. The Saw films are a recent example; the James Bond classic Dr No from the late 1950s is another. But the development of this phenomena does not explain its appeal. Why are people drawn to puzzles, challenges and the race against the clock tension of an escape room?

There has been some editorial speculation on the popularity of escape rooms and similar games and literature. One popular notion is that modern professionals are worked hard and kept on a busy schedule. Lives are structured, and this is something that we literally want which we want to escape. But we cannot really leave our lives because that would be irresponsible. Instead, we escape symbolically.

Perhaps this should come as no surprise. The term ‘escapism’ has long been applied to many types of entertainment Escape rooms manage to express this more literally, while also being a creative and intellectual exercise. Being confined to a small room, even handcuffed, normally wouldn’t seem like something that should be appealing. But we must remember that it is the escape we are looking forward to and not the sense of entrapment. Perhaps we already feel a little confined in our own life, and escaping this in a game gives us a sense of release.

Escape room game Sydney

Try the escape room that Sydney siders have found so appealing. Break out of a mindset or bad habit while pondering the puzzle before you. Exercise a different attitude or different thinking process. Best of all, experience something new with your friends or colleagues.

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